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Math AW 11 2012-13

Thanks for a terrific year! Have a great summer!

 

Important Information

Course Outline

We are currently working on reviewing for the final exam.
The final exam will be on Thursday, June 13, and Friday, June 14.

The chapter 7 project is a Budgeting Interview and Reflection. It should be completed as soon as possible.

The marks cut-off for my class will be Friday, June 14th at 3:30 pm. Hand in all missing work before then.

To see you current score for this class, visit Student Connect.
To see what you need to you need on the final exam, download this calculator or see this chart.

 

June 13/14 Exam day!

The class wrote the final exam and handed in textbooks. Congratulations on completing the year! Good luck on your other exams.

 

June 12 Block D

The class had a warm-up on finances and budgeting.

The class wrote a practice final exam. The real exam will be next class The first 20 or so are multiple-choice questions.

 

June 10/11

We had a warm-up on finding the surface area and volume for 3-dimensional shapes.

The class looked at review pages from chapter 6 and chapter 7. This is the final review day for block F.

The block F class tried a practice final exam. The real one will be about 50 marks. The first 20 or so are multiple-choice questions.

The final exams will be on Thursday, June 13 for block F and Friday, June 14 for block D.

 

June 6/7

The class started by looking at applications of trigonometry.

We then had time to do some review of Chapter 3 – Area, Volume, and Capacity. This should be completed for next class. Students will be given these formulas on the final exam.

The final exams will be on Thursday, June 13 for block F and Friday, June 14 for block D.

 

June 4/5

The class had a brief lesson on trigonometry. The class had time to work on the reviews for:
Chapter 4 – Trigonometry
Chapter 2 – Graphing

The interview projects should be submitted this week or early next week. You will need to hand in your interview questions and a written reflection after the interview.

The final exams will be on Thursday, June 13 for block F and Friday, June 14 for block D.

 

May 31/June 3

We had a warm-up on slope and then looked at scale diagrams.

Students should complete this scale drawings worksheet for next day.

The final exams will be on Thursday, June 13 for block F and Friday, June 14 for block D.

 

May 29/30

We started by going over the href=”https://skydrive.live.com/redir?resid=2EA04884A3DCF18B!3023&authkey=!AD6MHS6KAk0yVjo”>Chapter 7 – Personal Budgets Review Worksheet from last day.

The class wrote the last chapter test of the year. We will be reviewing for the final exams for the next two weeks. Students received the review for Chapter 1 – Slope today. Students should work on this review package and have it completed for next day. You will get this formula page during the exam.

The final exams will be on Thursday, June 13 for block F and Friday, June 14 for block D.

 

May 27/28

In groups, the class created some criteria for the interview projects that will be used to create a rubric for assessing the interview questions and reflection.

Students worked on creating circle graphs for the budgets on the Analyzing Budgets worksheet. After they completed the circle graphs, students had time to work on the Chapter 7 – Personal Budgets Review Worksheet.

There will be a chapter 7 test next class on Wednesday, May 29 for Block D and on Thursday, May 30 for Block F.

The final exams will be on Thursday, June 13 for block F and Friday, June 14 for block D.

 

May 22/23

The class started by comparing and contrasting surpluses with savings and debt with deficits.

Students began to work on their Budgeting Interview questions. We began to think about how this project with reflect all that students have learned in this unit.

Students wrote notes on creating circle graphs to keep track of where their money is going. Students should complete the two circle graphs on the Analyzing Budgets worksheet.

There will be a chapter 7 test in two classes on Wednesday, May 29 for Block D and on Thursday, May 30 for Block F.

 

May 17/21

The class started by looking at the Build Your Skills questions #1,2,3,5 starting on page 334. Many students had a bit of time to read through the Interview Project for this chapter.

Students then wrote a quiz on budgeting and percents.

We watched an episode of Princess.

 

May 15/16

The class worked on analyzing Mr. Hill’s budget. Students answered questions about average monthly income, percentages, and weekly/monthly spending.

Block D did not have time for this, but Block F watched an episode of Princess.

There will be a budgeting and percentages quiz next class.

 

May 13/14

We started with a warm-up to practice the percentages of a budget calculations that we started last day.

Students came up with examples of regular and variable income, as well as recurring, variable, unexpected and expenses. We defined balance budgets, surpluses, and deficits.

Mr. Hill’s Family Budget 2013. We went through the handout and used the following file to balance my family’s budget. On the handout, students should write down the numbers that create a balanced budget for my family.
Mr. Hill’s Budget 2013.

 

May 9/10

Students started the chapter by looking at worksheet that reviewed some concepts that we will need this chapter, including gross and net pay, percentages, and salaries.

Students looked at percentages of a budget. For practice, students should complete page 309 #2,4,5,6,8

 

May 7/8

We went over the review pages that students have been working on.

Students wrote the chapter 6 test on Financial Services.

Students received a worksheet to preview the work that we will do in chapter 7 starting next day.

 

May 3/6

The block D class spent the period looking at the review worksheet from last day.

We spent the remaining time in the block working in groups to create a equitable solution to this finance problem.

There will be a chapter test on Tuesday, May 7 and Wednesday, May 8.

 

May 1/2

The class started with a warm-up on monthly loan payments.

We wrote a quiz on monthly loan payments.

Students worked on a review worksheet.

There will be a chapter test in two classes (Tuesday, May 7 and Wednesday, May 8).

 

Apr 29/30

The class started with a warm-up on monthly loan payments.

In groups, students worked on reviewing the entire financial services chapter.

At the end of the block, students handed in a short worksheet on monthly loan payments.

There will be a quiz next day on loan payments.

There will be a chapter test in two classes (Friday, May 3 and Monday, May 6 postponed because Mr. Hill was away).

 

Apr 25/26

We had a warm-up to remind ourselves of credit card calculations. Students wrote a quiz on this.

We looked at other methods of borrowing. We looked at examples of loans and monthly payments.

For next day, students should use pages 288-299 to fill in the blanks on the notes. Also #1,2 on page 295.

 

Apr 23/24

Students worked in groups on some credit card calculations.

We did #1-7 on page 280.

Students investigated the effect that paying only the minimum payment on your credit card statement each month would have. They should complete this minimum payments worksheet for next class.

There will be a quiz next day on credit cards and their calculations.

 

Apr 18/22

We had a warm-up to review simple interest for lengths of 3 years, 30 days, and 31 days.

Students learned about credit cards and the different options that are available.

We did questions #1,4,5 on page 284 in the textbook for practice. Students completed and handed in three questions that were on the overhead.

 

Apr 16/17

The class started with a review of simple and compound interest and the rule of 72. Students then wrote a quiz on those topics.

We began to look at some of the options that people have in choosing a credit card.

 

Apr 12/15

The class started with a review of simple and compound interest and the rule of 72. We did a few warm-up questions.

We talked about how things change slightly when a payment is made after each compound period. The class did a interest worksheet. The answer key is here. Students answered a few questions to hand in before the class was over.

There will be an interest quiz next day: simple interest; compound interest; Rule of 72.

 

Apr 10/11

We looked at this warm-up which introduced the topic of compound interest.

Students took notes on compound interest and the Rule of 72. Students worked on this compound interest worksheet. There is an answer key on the back.

 

Apr 8/9

We did an example of bank fees and choosing the best bank account.

We looked at the formula for simple interest again. After some examples, students worked on this simple interest worksheet. An answer key is on the back of the page.

The class finished by writing an open book quiz on choosing the best account, bank fees, and simple interest calculations.

 

Apr 4/5

The class started by looking at which Northwest Bank of Canada bank account Mr. Hill would use based on his needs.

We did notes on 6.2 – Simple Interest.

Students were given two worksheets to practice:

Simple interest calculations

– Review of percents and converting times to years

An answer key for both worksheets is available here.

Students answered and handed in three questions at the end of class.

There will be a quiz next day on bank accounts and fees, and simple interest calculations.

 

Apr 2/3

The class started by discussing various bank account options. For example, the chequing accounts offered by TD Bank.

We went over some examples of calculations that are needed for Choosing the Best Account.

Students worked on page 262 #1-6 before writing a worksheet that was handed in to Mr. Hill.

 

Mar 14/15

The class had a warm-up in which they practiced their slope calculations. Students then wrote the chapter 1 test.

There was time at the end of class to work on the chapter 1 projects. Have a good spring break and Easter! See you in April!

 

Mar 12/13

The class had a warm-up in which they calculated teh rate of change on a graph, and then found slope, etc. The class wrote a quiz on Rates of Change. It was done in partners.

There was time at the end of class to work on the chapter 1 projects.

There will be a chapter 1 Test next class. The ramp projects will be due that day as well.

 

Mar 8/11

The class started with a warm-up about the costs of a plumber that charges a call-out fee and an hourly fee.

We then looked at finding the rates of change of grad night from last year. We were able to practice finding slope, as well as using slope to find a run.

There will be a quiz next day on Rates of Change.

There will be a chapter 1 Test on Thursday, March 14 and Friday, March 15. The ramp projects will be due that day as well.

 

Mar 6/7

Students wrote a quiz on 1.3 – Rates of change. They had to write the coordinates of points, determine the slope of a line of a graph, and calculate the slope of a line that would go through two points.

Students took notes on Rates of Change. There is a worksheet that should be completed by next day.

There will be a chapter 1 Test on Thursday, March 14 and Friday, March 15. The ramp projects will be due that day as well.

 

Mar 4/5

We went over notes for 1.3 – Rates of Change.

We practiced plotting coordinate points and finding the slope when given a line, or given two coordinates. One of the worksheets that students worked on was pages 4 and 5 of a Slope of a Line worksheet.

Students had time to work on their chapter 4 projects. We need to build five ramps at 1:40 scale.

 

Feb 28/March 1

Student worked on three warm-up questions.

We wrote a quiz that covered everything in chapter 1 so far:

– slope

– rise

– run

– slope of graphs

– grade

– angle of elevation

We looked at how to create the net for a triangular prism. Students had time to work on their projects.

 

Feb 26/27

Student worked in group on some slope and steepness questions as a 1.2 Warm-up.

Students had time to work on some questions in the textbook, and to see the chapter 1 project. For next day, everyone should complete page 30-31 #2,3,5,6.

There will be a quiz that covers everything in chapter 1 so far:

– slope

– rise

– run

– slope of graphs

– grade

– angle of elevation

 

Feb 25 – Block F

Students worked on a slope worksheet that had them calculate slopes, rises, and runs of various ramps and inclines.

We took notes for 1.2 Other Measure of Steepness and saw how steepness can also be describe as grades and angles of elevation. For next day, students should complete this worksheet.

 

Feb 22 – Block D

Students worked on a slope worksheet that had them calculate slopes, rises, and runs of various ramps and inclines.

We saw the answers to the worksheet from last day where they found the slope of a line on a graph.

We wrote notes for writing slopes in different formats and saw how steepness can also be describe as grades and angles of elevation. For next day, students should do #1 – 3 on this worksheet.

The sippy cup projects are now overdue. You need to hand in your calculations and the package that you constructed.

 

Feb 21 – Block F

Students did their course planning with the counselors for their grade 12 year.

When they came back, students went through this Imperial Measurement worksheet. We need to practice measurements in inches, so students worked on this handout measuring in inches.

The sippy cup projects are now overdue. You need to hand in your calculations and the package that you constructed.

 

Feb 20

Students did their course planning with the counselors for their grade 12 year. For next day, students should make sure that they have their work done from last day.

The sippy cup projects are now overdue. You need to hand in your calculations and the package that you constructed.

 

Feb 19

Students continued working on slope on a grid. We worked on, and later went over the answers for the odd questions on this worksheet (adapted from worksheets found at Kutasoftware.com).

Students worked on a slope worksheet where we needed to solve for slope, rise, or run.

Students will need to be able to measure using an imperial ruler, so students worked on this handout to practice measuring in inches.

We looked at the project for this unit. Students will need to create 5 ramps that are built at 1:40 scale.

The sippy cup projects are now overdue. You need to hand in your calculations and the package that you constructed.

 

Feb 14/18

The class practiced calculating slope, rise, and run.

We talked about finding the slope of a line on a graph, or from two coordinates.

Students worked on page 20 #1-4.

The sippy cup projects are now overdue. You need to hand in your calculations and the package that you constructed.

 

Feb 12/13

Students participated in a tournament game where players could take 1,2,or 3 pieces. This game was a subtraction game and, if you are really interested, we played using misère rules.

We took notes on Slope. Students worked on a worksheet finding the slope of ramps.

Students answered some questions about the tournament game and handed their responses in to Mr. Hill.

The sippy cup projects are now overdue. You need to hand in your calculations and the package that you constructed.

 

Feb 7/8

Students did a quick surface area, volume, and changing units warm-up.

Students saw the solutions for #1-3 on the surface area worksheet from last day.

We wrote the chapter 3 test on surface area and volume. The sippy cup project are now due.

There will be a tournament next day.

 

Feb 5/6

Students filled in a formula page to have quick access to volume formulas as well as the surface area ones. We looked at an answer key for #2a,b,e,f, 3, 4 on the volume worksheet from last day.

Students reviewed surface area and should complete #1-3 on the surface area worksheet. Students were given poster paper to construct the packaging for the sippy cup projects.

There will be a test on surface area and volumes on next day. The sippy cup project will be due that day.

 

Feb 1/4

Students handed in the surface area and the volume of their three different packaging designs for a sippy cup. The packaging should be drawn either isometrically, or orthographically (front, top, side views).

Students did a warm-up finding the surface area and volume of an object made of a cylinder and a rectangular prism.

We discussed the conversions between different units of area and volume.

Students worked on the volume practice worksheet. #2a,b,e,f, 3, 4 should be completed for next day.

There will be a test on surface area and volumes on Thursday, Feb. 7 and Friday, Feb. 8. The sippy cup project will be due that day.

 

Jan 30/31

Students did a warm-up finding the volume of three different shapes.

We wrote the volume quiz.

Students worked on calculating both the surface area and the volume of their three different packaging designs for a sippy cup. The packaging should be drawn either isometrically, or orthographically (front, top, side views).

There will be a test on surface area and volumes on Thursday, Feb. 7 and Friday, Feb. 8. The sippy cup project will be due that day.

 

Jan 28/29

Students investigated the effects that converting lengths to a different unit had on volume.

Students worked on a Volume of Composite Shapes worksheet. #1 (a-d) should be completed for next class. Students should also have come up with three different packaging designs for a sippy cup. The packaging should be drawn either isometrically, or orthographically (front, top, side views).

There will be a quiz on Volume next day.

 

Jan 24/25

Students tried to make as large (by volume) a rectangular prism as they could by cutting 4 squares from the corners of a sheet of letter-sized paper.

We investigated the effects that doubling, or tripling the lengths had on volume.

We tried to find the volume of a short pencil-shaped object that could be made up of three different 3d shapes.

 

Jan 22/23

 

Students looked at this video. In groups, they decided which cylinder would be better.

We worked through examples of finding the volume of a pyramid, a cone, and a sphere.

Students did #1,3,5 on Volume of Prisms and Cylinders and #1,4,7,8 on Volume of Pyramids, Cones, and Spheres. These should be completed for next day.

 

Jan 18/21

Students have worked in groups to find the surface area of a shape that includes a half sphere, a cylinder, and a cone. The resulting shape resembled a short, fat pencil. This was to reinforce the idea that we need to find the sum of the areas of each surface.

Students wrote Chapter 3 Quiz 2 – surface area.

We saw that volume of a prism is equal to the area of the base multiplied by the height of a prism. Volume of prism notes. See also my penny castle.

For next day, students should have the surface area and volume calculated for one of their designs for the chapter 3 project. Also do #1 and 3 on page 144.

 

Jan 16/17

Students investigated what happens to the surface area if the size of a shape is doubled, tripled or multiplied by some other factor. We looked at Surface Area when Length is Doubled.

Students also worked on the project for chapter 3 – You will design packaging for a sippy cup.

 

Jan 14/15

Students worked through examples of shapes where we do not include every side of the object. For example, the cone in an ice cream cone does not have a “base”.

Students are to complete these questions for next day: page 125 #1,4 and page 134 #1,3

We were introduced to the Chapter 3 project, which is to design three differently-shaped packages to sell a toddler sippy cup. More info in the next couple classes.

 

Jan 10/11

 

Students took notes on finding the surface area of 3D shapes, and we worked through 3 examples of shapes: a triangular prism, a square-based pyramid, and a sphere.

Students were given The Surface Area of Solids worksheet and worked on questions #3, 5, 9, 10, 12.

At the end of the block, there was a quiz that asked them to find the surface area of a rectangular prism and a triangular prism.

 

Jan 8/9

 

Students compared the surface areas and materials needed to make the rectangular prism boxes to hold 12 cans of Coke and Pepsi.

We looked at the surface area of rectangular and triangular prisms, and were reminded that we need to find the area of every side, and then add up the areas. Students had a handout that they were working on.

There will be a quiz next day that asks them to find the surface area of a rectangular prism and a triangular prism.

 

Jan 7

 

Students learned and played KenKen. We will play this again in the future.

We looked at the surface area of rectangular and triangular prisms, which we went over by the end of class.

 

Dec 21

Students learned and played two games: KenKen and Blackjack.

 

Dec 19 and 20

Students wrote the December Midterm Exam.

 

Dec 17 and 18

 

We continued to prepare for the December Midterm Exam. Students had this worksheet from the previous day. We went over the answers to the worksheet in class.

Block D also had a warm-up, which we went over in class.

 

Oct 26 and 29

 

We did a warm-up on bar graphs. page 80 #1,5,8

We looked at the calculations and skills needed to make a circle graph.

We graphed some data on a circle graph. These should be completed for next day.

 

Oct 24 and 25

 

We continued our graphing unit by looking at double-bar graph questions in the textbook. We did pages

The project for chapter 2 was introduced. We are creating brochures for a resort somewhere in Canada. The focus will be on advertising the best features of the resort and surrounding areas, and using graphs to convey data.

We experimented with graphing using Microsoft Excel. We graphed the data in this file: Sample data for graphing. The handout that we followed is here. Answer key is available here.

 

Oct 22 and 23

 

We continued our graphing unit by looking at broken-line graph questions in the textbook. We did pages 67 #2a-c, 3a-d, 4a,d, 5b,c.

Students looked at how to properly make a nice double bar graph. Data and Rubric and graph paper. Students assessed their work on the rubric, then handed in the graph for me to assess.

All Scale project tables now overdue if they have not been handed in yet. Get them in as soon as possible. Once your calculations are complete, let me look it over and if they look good, you will be given the foam to build with. You need to hand in your calculations with your completed table. Click here for Mr. Hill’s sample table slide show.

 

Oct 17 and 18

 

We began our graphing unit by discussing the uses of broken-line graphs. Students worked on graphing Ryan Kesler’s performance in the first eight years of his NHL career. Rubric and graph paper. Students assessed their work on the rubric, then handed in the graph for me to assess.

We looked at the chapter tests from last day.

All Scale project tables now overdue if they have not been handed in yet. Get them in as soon as possible. Once your calculations are complete, let me look it over and if they look good, you will be given the foam to build with. You need to hand in your calculations with your completed table. Click here for Mr. Hill’s sample table slide show.

 

Oct 15 and 16

 

We went over the review of four types of 3D drawing from this unit: orthographic, isometric, one-point perspective, exploded diagrams.

We wrote the scale unit test today.

We continued the Scale project. This project is due today. If your table and calculations were not handed in, they are now overdue. Get them in as soon as possible. Once your calculations are complete, let me look it over and if they look good, you will be given the foam to build with. Click here for Mr. Hill’s sample table slide show.

 

Oct 11 and 12

 

We did a review of drawing the four types of 3D drawing from this unit: orthographic, isometric, one-point perspective, exploded diagrams.

We continued the Scale project. Students have already faced many of the issues that are discussed here.

There will be a chapter test next class and the projects will be due that day. If you do not have your foam yet for the coffee table, you are behind and urgently need to catch up.

 

Oct 9 and 10

 

We did a review of writing a scale statement and of solving for a length of the original or copy size.

We continued the Scale project. Students have already faced many of the issues that are discussed here.

We marked the review for students to see how they did.

There will be a chapter test in 2 classes and the projects will be due in 2 classes.

 

Oct 4 and 5

 

We did a warm-up reviewing one-point perspective drawing and front, top, and side views.

We wrote a quiz on the four different drawing methods that we have studied.

We continued the Scale project. Students have already faced many of the issues that are discussed here.

There will be a chapter test in 3 classes and the projects will be due in 3 classes.

 

Oct 2 and 3

 

We practiced drawing using the different methods that we have seen in this chapter.

We started the Scale project. The Ikea assembly instructions were given to students as well.

There will be a chapter test in 3 classes (***update: test 4 classes from this point) and the projects will be due in 4 classes.

There will be a quiz on drawing 3-dimensional shapes next class (Thursday and Friday).

 

Sep 28 and Oct 1

 

Students warm-up by drawing one-point perspective drawings and looking at an example of an exploded diagram.

We were introduced to isometric drawings.

We drew isometric drawings as well as front, top, and side views.

We went to the computer lab to work on this worksheet.

The website that helped us see these views is  http://www.fisme.science.uu.nl/toepassingen/02015/toepassing_wisweb.en.html

 

Sept 26 and 27

 

Students were introduced to two types of 3-dimensional drawings.

We practiced drawing exploded diagrams and one-point perspective drawings.

 

Sept 21 and 25

We started with a warm-up reminding us how to calculate an actual or diagram length.

We did some practice in the textbook: page 215 #3,5,6

We wrote a quiz on calculating lengths if we are told (or able to find) the scale.

 

Sept 20 Block E

We started with a warm-up reminding us how to write a scale statement.

Students wrote a quiz on writing a scale statement that is written as a fraction in lowest terms.

They used a scale map to determine the distances from Vancouver to other parts of Canada.

There was notes and a worksheet giving more practice on solving for an actual or diagram length.

There will be a quiz next day on finding the actual or model size if you are given a scale.

 

Sept 19 Block D

 

We went over the worksheet from last day practicing writing a scale statement and solving for different sizes.

Students wrote a quiz on writing a scale statement that is written as a fraction in lowest terms.

They used a scale map to determine the distances from Vancouver to other parts of Canada.

They also looked at a building layout.

  1. Use the patio to find the scale of the diagram.
  2. Use the scale that you have found to determine the size of the garage and porch.

There will be a quiz next day on finding the actual or model size if you are given a scale.

 

Sept 17 and 18

Students got more practice today on writing a scale statement. Today it involved converting a measurement so that we had the same units.

An example of something students should be able to do is:

A blueprint is drawn so that 1/4 inch represents 2 feet on the actual building. After converting the measurements to the same units, write a scale statement for this blueprint.

Students in Block D were also able to use the scale and the drawing size to find the actual size.

There will be a warm-up quiz next class on scale statements.

 

Sept 13 and 14

Students reminded themselves how to convert measurements between feet and inches. Worksheet

We also were reminded of writing fractions and reducing them to lowest terms.

Block D also had time to work on scale statements. Block F did not start this at all due to the fire drill today.

 

Sept 11 and 12

Recipe

Group activity

Students were scaling a recipe a recipe up and down to made desserts for specific numbers of people, or using a specific amount of an ingredient.

 

Sept 7 and 10

Students discussed the size of a model of St. Peter’s Basilica.

Students should be able to find the size of a model given some information. For example, a model is 100 times smaller than a 40 ft building. Students also found that they were motivated to convert to other units (cm or inches) to make their measurements more useful.

One block also discussed the number of grandkids that the Duggars might have.

 

Sept 5 and 6

We discussed the course outline.

We worked on defining a classroom culture that is healthy, productive, and engaging. Striving for that culture will be a goal for our class each day for the rest of the year.

 

Chapter 1 – Slope and Rate of Change

“Slope occurs naturally in the world as well as in structures made by people. It affects the way we live, work, and play. In this chapter, you will learn how to use slope calculations to meet a need and to understand a relationship between two measurable quantities. You will use some familiar mathematics concepts, such as ratio, rate, trigonometry, and graphing, in a new context.” (MathWorks 11, page 10)

By the end of this chapter, you will be able to…

  • 1A – manipulate the slope formula to calculate rise, run, and slope for a line or a physical object
  • 1B – express slope as a ratio, angle, or percent grade
  • 1C – explain, using examples the connection between slope and rates of change
  • 1D – create and interpret line graphs and calculate rates of change

 

Chapter 2 – Graphical Representations

“In this chapter, you will explore different types of graphs, and discover how they are used in the workplace and in daily life. Graphs can be used to display data, and it is important to consider which type of graph best displays your message.” (MathWorks 11, page 54)

By the end of this chapter, you will be able to…

  • 2A – create the following types of graphs without technology: bar graphs, histograms, line graphs, and circle graphs
  • 2B – interpolate and extrapolate values from a graph
  • 2C – determine the types of graphs that should be used to display data, and explain the advantages and disadvantages of each
  • 2D – explain, using examples how different graphic representations of the same data set can be used to emphasize a point of view
  • 2E – create the following types of graphs with technology: bar graphs, line graphs, and circle graphs

 

Chapter 3 – Surface Area, Volume, and Capacity

“Many of the objects that you see every day are common three-dimensional objects. The soccer ball you played with is a sphere, the ice cream cone you ate is a cone, and the cereal box that holds your breakfast is a rectangular prism. When your soccer ball was created, someone measured how much leather would be needed to cover the ball. When your cereal box was designed, someone measured the space inside to determine how much cereal it could hold.” (MathWorks 11, page 114)

By the end of this chapter, you will be able to…

  • 3A – use and manipulate a formula to find the surface area of a 3-dimensional object
  • 3B – determine the surface area of a composite shape, using a net, or other technique
  • 3C – use and manipulate a formula to find the volume or capacity of a 3-dimensional object
  • 3D – determine the volume or capacity of a composite shape
  • 3E – solve problems that involve SI or imperial units in surface area, volume, or capacity measurements

 

Chapter 4 – Trigonometry of Right Angles

“Trigonometry – the mathematics of right triangles – has been used as a practical mathematical tool for thousands of years. Today, surveyors, carpenters, road builders, and metal fabricators are just some of the trades people who use trigonometry in their work.” (MathWorks 11, page 164)

By the end of this chapter, you will be able to…

  • 4A – use the sine, cosine, and tangent ratios to solve problems with one right-angled triangle
  • 4B – solve problems involving two right-angled triangles
  • 4C – solve problems involving right-angled triangles in three dimensions
  • 4D – solve problems involving angle of depression and angle of elevation

 

Chapter 5 – Scale Representations

“Have you ever read a map, sewed an article of clothing, built a model, or assembled a piece of furniture? Then you have likely used a scale represenation of a real object. In many workplaces, scale drawings or models are used to guide installation or assembly. Plumbers and carpenters, for example, often use drawings in their work. Builders and movie set crews are guided by models.

Who makes these drawings or models? They are created by people working in a variety of fields, including fashion, graphic, and interior design, surveying, and drafting, to name a few.” (MathWorks 11, page 208)

By the end of this chapter, you will be able to…

  • 5A – determine the scale of a drawing or model, written in lowest terms, without decimals
  • 5B – determine the dimensions of an object using a scale drawing or model
  • 5C – model and draw objects from top, front, and side views
  • 5D – draw objects using isometric dot paper
  • 5E – draw or describe objects exploded views or component parts of simple 3D objects

 

 

Chapter 6 – Financial Services

“There are probably things that you dream about buying one day. Maybe you want to save money for post-secondary education, buy a car or truck, or spend some money on entertainment clothes, or a new computer.

Whatever your goals are, whether they are big or small, it is important to understand how different services available from financial institutions can help you manage your money.” (MathWorks 11, page 252)

By the end of this chapter, you will be able to…

  • 6A –
  • 6B –
  • 6C –
  • 6D –

 

Chapter 7 – Personal Budgets

“In this chapter, you will learn the basics of budgeting and discover that budgets are a way to reach your personal goals.

Have you ever wanted to purchase something but found the item was too expensive? Perhaps you were looking at a new mountain bike or an MP3 player, but it cost more than you could afford. Maybe there is a computer graphics course you would like to take, but you don’t have the money saved for it.

A budget is your spending plan. Preparing and following a budget will allow you to live within your means, avoid the stress of debts, and give you the freedom to make choices with the money you have. Most importantly, a budget will all you to plan how to achieve your goals.” (MathWorks 11, page 300)

By the end of this chapter, you will be able to…

  • 7A –
  • 7B –
  • 7C –
  • 7D –
s a n d s